Printable/Searchable Help File
This document is roughly 70 printed pages.

Overview
ISI Citation Databases
Available Databases
Technical Support
Searching
Easy Search
Topic Search
Person Search
Place Search
Full Search
General Search
Cited Reference Search
Using Search Operators
Saving and Running Queries
Results
Flowchart of Results Pages
Results Summary Screen
Results Full Record Screen
Marked Records
Exporting Records
Ordering Records
Printing Records
Saving Records


Help Contents
ISI Citation Databases

ISI Citation Databases are multidisciplinary databases of bibliographic information indexed so that you can search for specific articles by subject, author, journal, and/or author address. Because the information stored about each article includes the article's cited reference list (often called its bibliography), you can also search the databases for articles that cite a known author or work.

Cited Reference Searching, unique to ISI, lets you use a given work as if it were a subject term to identify more recent articles on the same topic. For example, you can find all works that reference articles published by A. Williamson in 1995 in the Journal of Neurophysiology (J Neurophysiol). This type of searching often locates relevant articles that cannot be retrieved through traditional subject-author searching.

Two search options are available:

  • Easy Search - Offers a simplified topic, person, or place search that returns a maximum of 100 results.
  • Full Search - Offers the full range of General Search and Cited Reference Search options and returns a site-configured maximum number of results (default number is 500).


Help Contents
Available Databases

Science Citation Index Expanded
Social Sciences Citation Index
Arts & Humanities Citation Index

Science Citation Index Expanded
The Science Citation Index is a multidisciplinary database, with searchable author abstracts, covering the journal literature of the sciences. It indexes 5,300 major journals across 164 scientific disciplines, covering approximately 2,000 more journals than its SCI print and CD-ROM counterparts, with all cited references captured.

SCI Expanded:

    Provides access to current information and retrospective data from 1974 forward.

    Averages 17,000 new articles per week.

    Includes approximately 300,000 new cited references per week.

    Contains a current total of over 14 million articles.

    Contains searchable, full-length, English-language author abstracts for approximately 70% of the articles in the database.

Some of the disciplines covered include:

    Agriculture Neuroscience
    Astronomy Oncology
    Biochemistry Pediatrics
    Biology Pharmacology
    Biotechnology Physics
    Chemistry Plant Sciences
    Computer Science Psychiatry
    Materials Science Surgery
    Mathematics Veterinary Science
    Medicine Zoology

Social Sciences Citation Index
The Social Sciences Citation Index is a multidisciplinary database, with searchable author abstracts, covering the journal literature of the social sciences. It indexes 1,700 journals spanning 50 disciplines, as well as covering individually selected, relevant items from over 3,300 of the world's leading scientific and technical journals.

SSCI:

    Provides access to current information and retrospective data from 1972 forward.

    Averages 2,800 new articles per week.

    Includes approximately 50,000 new cited references per week.

    Contains a current total of over 2.8 million articles.

    Contains searchable, full-length, English-language author abstracts for approximately 60% of the articles in the database.

Some of the disciplines covered include:

    Anthropology Political Science
    History Public Health
    Industrial Relations Social Issues
    Information Science
    & Library Science
    Social Work
    Law Sociology
    Linguistics Substance Abuse
    Philosophy Urban Studies
    Psychology Women's Studies
    Psychiatry  

Arts & Humanities Citation Index
Arts & Humanities Citation Index is a multidisciplinary database covering the journal literature of the arts and humanities. It indexes 1,100 of the world's leading arts and humanities journals, as well as covering individually selected, relevant items from over 6,800 major science and social science journals.

A&HCI:

    Provides access to current information and retrospective data from 1975 forward.

    Averages 2,200 new articles per week.

    Includes approximately 15,000 new cited references per week.

    Contains a current total of over 2.3 million articles.

    Contains unique implicit citations that reference you to actual representations of a work of art or music score.

    Contains title enhancements added to obscure or hard-to-categorize article titles to clarify article contents

Some of the disciplines covered include:

    Archaeology Linguistics
    Architecture Literary Reviews
    Art Literature
    Asian Studies Music
    Classics Philosophy
    Dance Poetry
    Folklore Radio, Television, & Film
    History Religion
    Language Theater


Help Contents
Getting Help

If you have any questions about the use of ISI Citation Databases, please contact the Technical Help Desk. The Help Desk answers questions about the Citation data, as well as questions about appropriate search and retrieval techniques. Questions about network connections and/or the use of your Web browser should be directed to your network administrator.

To contact the Technical Help Desk:

ISI - U.S.A. ISI - Europe ISI - Japan
3501 Market Street Brunel Science Park Ark Mori Building, 30F
Philadelphia, PA19104
U.S.A.
Uxbridge UB8 3PQ
U.K.
1-12-32 Akasaka
Minato-ku, Tokyo 107, Japan
Telephone: (215) 386-0100, ext. 1591
or (800) 336-4474
Telephone: +44-1895-270016 Telephone: +81-3-5562-3572
Fax: (215) 386-6362
Attn: Technical Help Desk
Fax: +44-1895-256710
Attn: Technical Help Desk
Fax: +81-3-5562-3564
Attn: Technical Help Desk
Email: help@isinet.com Email: eurohelp@isinet.com Email: jphelp@isinet.com


Help Contents
Easy Search

Easy Search offers a simplified topic, person, or place search that returns a maximum of 100 results.

To begin an Easy Search:

  1. Select one or more database to search. The search will cover the entire time span indicated beside the database name and will return a maximum of 100 results.
  2. Click one of the following buttons to indicate what type of search you want to perform.

      Topic - Search for articles based on subject matter.
      Person - Search for articles by, about, or referring to the work of a specified person.
      Place - Search for articles based on author addresses.


Help Contents
Topic Search

To search for articles by topic:

  1. Enter a word or phrase that describes the subject matter of the articles as precisely as possible. You may also enter a series of words or phrases joined by search operators such as AND or OR. See Topic Search Rules for more information.
  2. Select the order in which you want the articles to be displayed.
  3. Click Search.

Topic Search Examples

  • Enter HEPATITIS to search for articles on this topic.
  • Enter MAD COW DISEASE to search for articles on this topic.
  • Enter AIDS OR HIV to search for articles on either topic.
  • Enter HEPATITIS B AND HEPATITIS C to search for articles on both topics.

Sort Order

  • Relevance - Lists first those articles that contain the most frequent occurrences of the words and/or phrases you entered to describe your topic.
  • Reverse chronological order - Lists most recent articles first based on the date on which the journal was processed at ISI.

Topic Search Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter either NAFTA, Nafta, or nafta to search for articles on this trade agreement.
  • Enter words and phrases without quotation marks.
    For example, enter GENETIC TESTING to search for articles containing this phrase. Words entered as a series with no punctuation separating them are assumed to be a phrase.
  • Separate multiple words or phrases by search operators such as AND or OR.
    For example, enter CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME AND RADIAL TUNNEL SYNDROME to search for articles about both of these syndromes.
    Enter NAFTA OR NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT to search for articles that refer to this agreement by either its acronym or full name.
  • Be aware that certain frequently used words such as A, AN, THE, OF and IN are stopwords that are not explicitly searchable even though they may be entered as part of a search phrase.


Help Contents
Person Search

You can search for a person as:

  • An author, finding articles written by that person
  • A cited author, finding articles that refer to the work of that person
  • A subject, finding articles about that person

Author Search

To search for articles by a specific person:

  1. Enter the author's last name followed by a space and up to 3 initials (leave them out if you don't know them). See Author Name Rules for more information.
  2. Click "Show me all the articles in the database that this person has authored."
  3. Click Search.

Author Search Examples

  • Enter CHANDLER to search for any author whose last name is Chandler.
  • Enter CHANDLER N to search for any author whose last name is Chandler and whose only initial is N.
  • Enter CHANDLER ND to search for any author whose last name is Chandler and whose only initials are ND.
  • Enter CHANDLER N* to search for any author whose last name is Chandler, whose first initial is N, and who may have other subsequent initials (the asterisk stands for possible subsequent initials).
  • Enter OBRIAN to search for any author whose last name is O'Brian.
  • Enter BROSNANMYERS to search for any author whose last name is Brosnan-Myers.
  • Enter DEVILLE * OR DE VILLE * to search for any author whose last name is De Ville. Note that the two versions of the name are joined by OR, one version with the space and one without.

Author Name Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter STERLING, Sterling, or sterling.
  • Use a space to separate the last name and initial(s)
    For example, enter BARTHES R to search for Roland Barthes.
  • Leave the initials out if you don't know them.
    For example, enter HAYDEN to search for any author whose last name is Hayden.
  • Use an asterisk after the first initial if you don't know the other initials.
    For example, enter KREEGER K* to search for any author whose last name is Kreeger and whose first name starts with K. Note that entering Kreeger K will search for only those authors who have the single initial K.
  • If the last name includes embedded spaces, enter the name both with and without spaces, joining the two versions of the name with OR.
    For example, enter DEVILLE * OR DE VILLE * for De Ville.
  • If the last name includes a nonalphanumeric character, enter the name without the character.
    For example, enter OBRIAN for O'Brian.

Cited Author Search

To search for articles that refer to the work of a specific person:

  1. Enter the author's last name followed by a space and up to 3 initials (leave them out if you don't know them). Since authors are not always cited using all of their initials, you may want to enter the first initial followed by an asterisk, to retrieve all variants of the author's name. See Cited Author Name Rules for more information.
  2. Click "Show me all the articles in the database that cite this person's work."
  3. Click Search.

Cited Author Search Examples

  • Enter CHANDLER to search for any cited author whose last name is Chandler.
  • Enter CHANDLER N to search for any cited author whose last name is Chandler and whose only initial is N.
  • Enter CHANDLER ND to search for any cited author whose last name is Chandler and whose only initials are ND.
  • Enter CHANDLER N* to search for any cited author whose last name is Chandler, whose first initial is N, and who may have other subsequent initials (the asterisk stands for possible subsequent initials).
  • Enter OBRIAN to search for any cited author whose last name is O'Brian.
  • Enter BROSNANMYERS to search for any cited author whose last name is Brosnan-Myers.
  • Enter DEVILLE * OR DE VILLE * to search for any cited author whose last name is De Ville. Note that the two versions of the name are joined by OR, one version with the space and one without.

Cited Author Name Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter STERLING, Sterling, or sterling.
  • Use a space to separate the last name and initial(s)
    For example, enter BARTHES R to search for Roland Barthes as an author or cited author.
  • Leave the initials out if you don't know them.
    For example, enter HAYDEN to search for any person whose last name is Hayden.
  • Use an asterisk after the first initial if you don't know the other initials.
    For example, enter KREEGER K* to search for any person whose last name is Kreeger and whose first name starts with K. Note that entering Kreeger K will search for only those people who have the single initial K.
  • If the last name is longer than fifteen characters, enter the first fifteen characters followed by an asterisk to represent the remaining characters.
  • If the last name includes embedded spaces, enter the name both with and without spaces, joining the two versions of the name with OR.
    For example, enter DEVILLE * OR DE VILLE * for De Ville.
  • If the last name includes a nonalphanumeric character, enter the name without the character.
    For example, enter OBRIAN for O'Brian.

Person as Subject Search

To search for articles about a specific person:

  1. Enter the last name only when the name is sufficiently unique (e.g., CHAUCER). If you need to enter a first name, see Subject Search Rules.
  2. Click "Show me articles that are about this person."
  3. Click Search.

Person as Subject Search Examples

  • Enter DICKENS to search for articles about Charles Dickens.
  • Enter BULWER LYTTON OR BULWERLYTTON to search for articles about William Bulwer Lytton.
  • Enter OCASEY OR O CASEY to search for articles about Sean O'Casey.
  • Enter BRONTE EMILY OR EMILY BRONTE to search for articles about Emily Bronte.
  • Enter BROWNING ROBERT OR ROBERT BROWNING to search for articles about Robert Browning.

Person as Subject Search Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter STERLING, Sterling, or sterling.
  • Enter only the last name, if the name is sufficiently unique.
    For example, entering THACKERAY is sufficient to search for articles about William Thackeray.
  • If you need to include a first name, enter the name in both first last and last first format.
    For example, enter BROWN CHARLES BROCKDEN OR CHARLES BROCKDEN BROWN to search for articles about Charles Brockden Brown.
  • If the last name includes embedded spaces, enter the name both with and without the space. Join the two versions of the name with OR.
    For example, enter DELAMARE OR DE LA MARE to search for articles about Walter de la Mare.
  • If the last name includes a nonalphanumeric character, enter the name both without the character and with the character replaced by a space. Join the two versions of the name with OR.
    For example, enter OCASEY OR O CASEY for O'Casey.


Help Contents
Place Search

To search for articles written by authors from a specific institution and/or geographic place:

  1. Enter a word or phrase from the author's address. Note that address elements are frequently abbreviated. See Place Search Rules for more information.

    For geographic places Enter a place identifier such as a country or state/province abbreviation or a postal code.
    For institutions Enter a name such as a corporation or university name.
    For institutions in a specific place Enter the institution name followed by SAME and a place identifier.
    For a specific department/division of an institution Enter the institution name followed by SAME and the department/division name.

  2. Click Search.

Place Search Examples

  • Enter NY to search for records that include NY in the address field.
  • Enter IBM to search for records that include IBM in the address field.
  • Enter UCLA to search for records that include UCLA in the address field.
  • Enter DUPONT SAME DE to search for records in which DUPONT and DE appear in the same address.
  • Enter UCLA SAME MED to search for records in which UCLA and MED (for MEDICAL) appear in the same address.

Place Search Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter MERCK, Merck, or merck to search for authors whose address includes this company name.
  • When searching for a state or province as a location, enter the name using the two-character postal abbreviation.
    For example, enter PA to search for authors whose address is in the state of Pennsylvania. Enter PQ to search for authors whose address is in the province of Quebec. Check the list of state/country name abbreviations.
  • Check the list of corporate and institution abbreviations to see if an institution name such as Centers for Disease Control should be abbreviated.
    For example, this list indicates that you should search for authors whose address includes the National Institutes of Health by entering NIH instead of the full institution name.

    Note that even corporate and institutional names that do not appear on this list may be abbreviated in ISI's database if the address appears abbreviated in the source publication.

    Note also that searching for some very common words/abbreviations (e.g., UNIV for University) is disallowed in the Place field, as such searches would return too many results. These disallowed words may, however, be used in conjunction with other words that narrow the search (e.g., UNIV PENN).

  • Check the list of other address abbreviations to see if any other part of the author's address, such as the street address or department/division name, should be abbreviated. Also check the state/country name abbreviation lists for abbreviations of U.S. states and coutries.
    For example, this list indicates that the words EAST and EDUCATION (as in Department of Education) should be abbreviated as E and EDUC when they appear in an author's address.
  • Separate values with the OR operator to search for records containing any value in the list.
    For example, enter USDA OR FDA to search records with either institution in the address field.
  • Separate values with SAME to search for records containing the search terms in the same address.
    For government agencies, companies, or universities with multiple locations, you can enter the institution name and a location to search for records where the search terms appear in the same author address. For example, enter IBM SAME JAPAN to search for records where IBM and JAPAN appear in the same address.


Help Contents
Full Search

Full Search offers the full range of General Search and Cited Reference Search options and returns a site-configured maximum number of results (default number is 500).

  1. Select the database(s) you want to search by clicking the checkbox next to:
  2. Select the time period you want to search by clicking the radio button next to:
    • This week's update - Searches the mostly recently loaded single week of data.
    • Latest 2 Weeks - Searches the most recent two weeks of data.
    • Latest 4 Weeks - Searches the most recent four weeks of data.
    • All years - Searches the entire range of years that appears beside the names of the database(s) you have selected.
    • Year selection - Searches only the years you have marked. See the year range beside the database name to see what years are available for each database.
  3. Select the type of search by clicking:
    • General Search - Searches for articles by subject, author, journal, or author address. Returns a site-configured number of results.
    • Cited Ref Search - Searches for articles that have cited (included in their reference list) a known work. Returns a site-configured number of results.
    • Run Saved Query - Searches by selecting and running a query you have previously saved.


Help Contents
General Search

To search the selected database(s) for articles based on what you know about their subject matter, author(s), publication, or author address(es):

  1. Click Clear to remove search parameters from previous searches.
  2. Enter information in one or more search fields.
  3. Select any of the following options (scroll down to the bottom of the page):
  4. Optionally Save Query.
  5. Click Search.

Examples

  • Enter MAD COW DISEASE in the Topic field to search for articles on this topic.
  • Enter FOUCAULT M in the Author field to search for articles written by this author.
  • Enter JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE in the Source Title field to search for articles in this journal.
  • Enter PENN STATE in the Address field to search for articles written by authors whose addresses include this university.

Search Fields

Topic
Enter a word or phrase that might appear in the article title, abstract, or keyword list. You may also enter a series of words or phrases joined by search operators such as AND or OR. See Search Field Rules for more information. Use the Title only checkbox to restrict the search to article titles.

For example:

    Enter HEPATITIS to search for records containing this word.
    Enter MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES to search for records containing this phrase.
    Enter HEPATITIS AND HEMODIALYSIS to search for records containing both these words.
    Enter HEPATITIS B OR HEPATITIS C to search for records containing either of these phrases.

You may use wildcard characters such as the question mark and asterisk to search for variants of words. The question mark can be used to represent any single character. The wildcard can be used to represent any group of characters (including no characters).

For example:

    Enter CHEM* to search for words starting with these letters and ending with any group of letters (e.g., CHEMISTRY, CHEMICAL, CHEMIST, CHEMISTS).

    Enter DERMATOS?S to search for words that consist of the specified letters with any single letter in the place of the question mark (e.g., DERMATOSIS or DERMATOSES).

     

Note that certain frequently used words (e.g., words such as A, AN, THE, OF, IN) are not searchable in the Topic field. These stopwords may be entered as part of a phrase, but they will not be explicitly searched for. Instead, they will act as word wildcards. For example, searching for DEATH IN VENICE returns you any article that contains the words DEATH and VENICE separated by any single word.

More search examples

Author

Enter an author/editor name with the last name first, followed by a space and up to 5 initials. Unless you know all initials in an author's name, put an asterisk after the initial(s) you have entered (e.g., HOFFMAN E*). You may also enter last names without initials. Join multiple names with the search operators AND or OR.

For example:

    Enter CHANDLER to search for articles by any author whose last name is Chandler.

    Enter CHANDLER ND to search for articles by any author whose last name is Chandler and whose only initials are ND.

    Enter CHANDLER N* to search for articles by any author whose last name is Chandler, whose first initial is N, and who may have other subsequent initials (the asterisk stands for possible subsequent initials).

    Enter CHANDLER ND OR WILLIAMS CD to search for articles by either author.

    Enter CHANDLER ND AND WILLIAMS CD to search for jointly authored articles.

    If an author's last name includes spaces (e.g., de Ville, de los Rios), enter this name both with and without the space(s). Join the two versions of the name with OR. For example, enter DEVILLE * OR DE VILLE * for de Ville, DELOSRIOS * OR DE LOS RIOS * for de los Rios.

    If an author's last name includes a nonalphanumeric character (e.g., O'Brian, Kroll-Smith), enter this name without the character. For example, enter OBRIAN for O'Brian, KROLLSMITH for Kroll-Smith.

Note that the ISI databases contain the names of all authors/editors associated with a document.

More search examples

Source title

Enter a full or partial journal title, copying titles from the journal list as necessary. If you enter a partial title, end it with an asterisk (e.g., JOURNAL OF MATERIALS *). You may also enter multiple titles joined by the search operator OR.

For example:

    Enter JOURNAL OF CELL TRANSPLANTATION to search for articles in this journal.
    Enter JOURNAL OF CELL * to search for articles in any journal whose name begins with these words.

If you copy or enter a title from the journal list whose name contains the word AND, OR, or SAME, enclose these words in quotation marks before clicking Save Query or Search.

More search examples

Address

Enter an institution and/or place name from an author's address to search for records based on address. Note that institution and place names are frequently abbreviated in the ISI databases. Refer to the lists of abbreivated street address and department/division names and state/country names.

For example:

    Enter TUFTS to search for articles in which at least one author has an address that includes TUFTS UNIVERSITY.

    Enter CDC to search for articles in which at least one author has an address that includes CDC.

Since the address field in the database includes the institution/corporation name, department name, street address, city, province, state, country, and postal code of every author of a given article, use the SAME operator to search for two or more words that appear within the same address.

For example:

    Enter IBM SAME NY to search for articles in which IBM and NY appear in the same address (to find an author whose address is one of IBM's New York facilities).

    Enter HARVARD SAME MED to search for articles in which HARVARD and MED appear in the same address (to search for an author whose address is Harvard Medical School).

Note that many address elements such as the institution/corporation name are abbreviated in the ISI database.

Note also that searching for some very common words/abbreviations (e.g., UNIV for University) is disallowed in the address field, as such searches would return too many results. These disallowed words may, however, be used in conjunction with other words that narrow the search (e.g., UNIV PENN).

More search examples

 

Search Field Rules

  • Use either upper, lower, or mixed case.
    For example, enter AIDS, Aids, or aids.
  • Enter words and phrases without quotation marks.
    For example, enter GENETIC TESTING to search for articles containing this phrase. Words entered as a series with no punctuation separating them are assumed to be a phrase.
  • Separate two or more terms by logical operators such as AND or OR.
    The OR operator instructs the search engine to find records containing any one of the search terms in a given field. The AND operator instructs the search engine to find records containing all of the search terms specified in a given field. Other search operators are available.

    For example, enter MAD COW DISEASE OR BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY to search for articles containing either one of these phrases.

    Enter BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY AND SCRAPIE to search for articles containing both of these terms.

  • Use quotation marks around the words AND, OR, NOT, SAME, or SENT in any field when you do not intend these words to serve as search operators.
    For example, to search for works authored by William Or, enter "OR", W. To search for works authored by O. R. Koechli, enter KOECHLI, "OR". To search for the journal title ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM, enter ARCHITECTURE "AND" URBANISM.
  • Use the asterisk and question mark as wildcards to search for variants of words.
    For example, enter ENZYM* to search for words that start with these letters but end with any group of letters (e.g., ENZYME, ENZYMATIC, ENZYMOLOGY).
  • Search for hyphenated words/phrases by entering the terms both without the hyphen and with the hyphen replaced by a space. Join the two versions of the term with OR.
    For example, to search for works containing the word PRE-RAPHAELITE, enter PRE RAPHAELITE OR PRERAPHAELITE. To search for works containing the word X-RAY, enter X RAY OR XRAY.
  • Search for words/phrases containing apostrophes or other internal punctuation by entering the terms both without the punctuation mark and with the punctuation mark replaced with a space. Join the two versions of the term with OR.
    For example, to search for works containing the word PAGET'S DISEASE, enter PAGET S DISEASE OR PAGETS DISEASE.

Options

Limits

Two optional restriction lists enable you to limit your search to articles written in a specific language or articles of a specific document type. You may select one or more options from each list. Note that these restrictions stay in effect until they are cleared by clicking Clear. Note also that the restrictions do not apply unless you have entered data in at least one search field.

Sorting

Sort options include:

  • Latest Date - (The default sort option.) Sorts retrieved records based on the date the publication was processed at ISI, with the most recently processed records listed first.
  • Relevance - Sorts retrieved records based on a ranking system that considers how many of the search terms are found in each record, how frequently the search terms appear,and how close together the occurrences are. Records with the highest ranking appear at the top of the list.
  • Times Cited - Sorts retrieved records based on the number of times the work was cited in other works.
  • First Author - Sorts retrieved records in alphabetical order, based on the name of the first listed author.
  • Source Title - Sorts retrieved records in alphabetical order, based on the source (e.g., journal) title.


Help Contents
Search Results Summary

The Search Results Summary screen displays a list of records retrieved by a search, with articles identified by the first three authors (et al. is appended to indicate more than three authors), title, and source journal information. At the top of the screen, the search fields and their contents are displayed. You can also see how many records satisfied your search criteria.

  • To print this list - Use the print option of your Web browser.
  • To see more information about an article on the list - Click the article title to see the full record for this article in the ISI database.
  • To print or export information about an article
    1. Click the checkbox to the left of the author name to select an article.
    2. Submit your selection(s) by clicking "Submit."
    3. Click Marked List to display the Marked Records screen.
    4. Follow the instructions on this screen to print or export one or more records.
  • To order the full text of an article
    1. Click the checkbox to the left of the author name to select an article.
    2. Submit your selection(s) by clicking "Submit."
    3. Click Marked List to display the Marked Records screen.
    4. Follow the instructions on this screen to order the text of an article.
  • To navigate through this list - Click the navigation arrows or the page numbers to move through the data.
  • To mark or unmark all 10 items on the page - Click Mark All. Note: To clear all marked records and begin a new search session, click the "Home" button, then "New Session."
  • To add marked records to your marked list - Click "Submit."

The Articles # - # indicator allows you to keep track of which screen you are on.


Help Contents
More Search Examples

Topic Examples
Word/phrase examples
Search operator examples
Wildcard examples

Word/phrase examples
Some simple examples of topic searches are single words or phrases that describe, as precisely as possible, the subject matter of the article you are looking for. For example:

  • Searching for ROBOTICS returns records containing this word in the title, abstract, or keyword list.
  • Searching for MEDICAL ROBOTICS returns records containing this phrase in the title, abstract, or keyword list.

Search operator examples
Search operators can be used to refine topic searches. For example, the most common operators -- AND and OR -- join search terms so as to narrow or broaden your search. The NOT operator can be used to exclude records containing certain words or phrases from your search.

AND - Use AND to find records containing simultaneous occurrences of specified words or phrases. For example:

  • Searching for SEROTONIN AND SCHIZOPHRENIA returns records containing both words.
  • Searching for SEROTONIN AND SCHIZOPHRENIA AND DOPAMINE will return records containing all three words.

OR - Use the OR operator to find records containing occurrences of any one of a specified series of words or phrases. For example:

  • Searching for CELL OR CELLS returns records containing either the singular or plural form of the word.
  • Searching for AIDS OR HIV OR ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME OR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS returns records containing any one of these terms.
  • Searching for SAMUEL L CLEMENS OR MARK TWAIN in the Topic field will return records containing either of these names.

NOT - Use the NOT operator to exclude records containing certain words from your search. For example:

  • Searching for SUICIDE NOT PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED returns records containing the word SUICIDE but without the phrase PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED.
  • Searching for SUICIDE NOT (PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED OR DOCTOR-ASSISTED) will further limit your search to records containing the word SUICIDE but without either the phrase PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED or DOCTOR-ASSISTED. The parentheses are used in this example to indicate that the OR operator should be evaluated before the NOT operator.

Wildcard examples
Wildcards are useful in topic searches to retrieve variants of words. The asterisk wildcard represents any group of characters, including no character. The question mark wildcard represents any single character. You can use these wildcards within and at the ends of terms.

For example:

  • Searching for SUPERCONDUCT* returns records containing words like SUPERCONDUCTOR, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, SUPERCONDUCTORS, SUPERCONDUCTIVE.
  • Searching for SUL*UR returns records containing SULPHUR or SULFUR.
  • Searching for EPINEPHRIN* returns records containing both EPINEPHRIN and EPINEPHRINE.
  • Searching for EN?OBLAST returns records containing both ENDOBLAST and ENTOBLAST.
  • Searching for EPISTAS?S returns records containing both EPISTASIS and EPISTASES.

Person/Author Examples
Simple examples
Search operator examples
Wildcard examples

Simple examples
Some simple examples of person/author searches are those in which you know the exact spelling of the person's name and can enter that, along with the exact initials. For example:

  • Searching for STEVENS AW as an author returns records for works authored by A.W. Stevens.
  • Searching for STEVENS AW as a cited author returns records referring to any work by A.W. Stevens.

Search operator examples
Search operators are useful in person/author searches when you want to search for more than one person or more than one spelling of a name. For example:

  • Searching for STEVENS OR STEPHENS as an author returns records for works authored by anyone whose last name is Stevens or Stephens.
  • Searching for LE CORBUSIER C* OR LECORBUSIER C* as a subject returns records about Charles Le Corbusier.

Wildcard examples
Wildcards are useful in person/author searches to retrieve records when you do not know the exact spelling of a person's name or an author's exact initials. The asterisk wildcard represents any group of characters, including no character. The question mark wildcard represents any single character. You can use these wildcards within and at the ends of terms.

For example:

  • Searching for YAO?ANG returns records for people whose last name consists of the specified letters with any letter in the place of the question mark (e.g., YAOBANG or YAOPANG).
  • Searching for TUT?NKHAM?N returns records for people whose name consists of the specified letters with any letter in the place of the question mark (e.g., TUTANKHAMEN or TUTENKHAMON).
  • Searching for BART* returns records for people whose last names start with BART and end with any group of letters, including no letters (e.g., BART, BARTE, BARTH, BARTHE, BARTHES). This use of the asterisk is helpful when you don't know the exact spelling of a person's name.
  • Searching for HOFFMAN E* returns records for authors whose last name is HOFFMAN, whose first initial is E, and who may have other initials after E (including no other initials). Unless you are sure that you know all the initials associated with an author's name, you should get in the habit of placing an asterisk after the initial(s) you enter. Keep in mind that searching for HOFFMAN, E will retrieve only records for authors with that single initial. It will not retrieve articles by authors such as E.T. HOFFMAN or E.T.A. HOFFMAN.

Source Title Examples

Wildcards are useful in Source Title searches to retrieve records when you do not know the entire or exact title of a journal. The asterisk wildcard represents any group of characters, including no character. The question mark wildcard represents any single character. You can use these wildcards within and at the ends of terms. Note that the wildcarded terms must always be the first terms in the journal title, not terms that appear in the middle or end of the title.

For example:

  • Searching for ARCHITECT* returns records for journals whose titles begin with words that start with ARCHITECT and end with any group of letters, including no letters, such as ARCHITECTURE, ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW, ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, ARCHITECTURA, and ARCHITECTURE & URBANISM.
  • Searching for CH?MI* returns records for journals whose titles begin with words such as CHEMIST, CHEMISTRY, CHEMICAL, CHIMIA, CHIMICA, and CHEMIE.

Place/Address Examples
Simple examples
Search operator examples
Wildcard examples

Simple examples
Some simple examples of place searches are those in which you want to find articles whose authors are associated with a single company, research lab, or university. In this case, you can enter an institution name or abbreviation. For example:

  • Searching for SANDIA returns records for works authored by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories.
  • Searching for IBM returns records for works authored by researchers at IBM.
  • Searching for SANDOZ returns records authored by researchers at Sandoz.
  • Searching for DREXEL returns records authored by researchers at Drexel University.
  • Searching for UCLA returns records authored by researchers at UCLA.

Search operator examples
Search operators are useful in place/address searches to search for single addresses. If an article has multiple authors, all author addresses are included in the address field, with each address ending with a period. In order to search most effectively for a single address within the field, you can use the search operator SAME to limit your search to records containing the specified search terms within the same sentence, where a sentence is assumed to be a period-delimited string. SAME is more useful than AND in this case, because AND operates across the entire field (thus, in some cases, across multiple addresses).

For example:

  • Searching for THOMAS AND WATSON returns records that contain these two words anywhere in the address field, even if the words appear in different authors' addresses.
  • Searching for THOMAS SAME WATSON returns records that contain these two words within the same address (e.g., authors whose address is IBM's THOMAS J WATSON RESEARCH CENTER).

Wildcard examples
Wildcards are useful in place/address searches to retrieve records when you do not know the exact spelling of a corporate/institution name or the way in which it may have been abbreviated in the database. The asterisk wildcard represents any group of characters, including no character. The question mark wildcard represents any single character. You can use these wildcards within and at the ends of terms.

For example:

  • Searching for HARVARD SAME MED* returns records where HARVARD and any word starting with the letters MED are in the same address. This search will find records for authors associated with HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL regardless of whether MEDICAL is abbreviated as MED.
  • Searching for UCLA SAME PED* returns records where UCLA and any word starting with the letters PED are in the same address. This search will find records for authors associated with UCLA DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS regardless of how the department name is abbreviated.


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Stopwords

Stopwords are frequently used words such as articles (e.g., a, an, the), prepositions (e.g., of, in, for, through), and pronouns (e.g., it, their, his) that may be included in topic search phrases but are not explicitly searchable. For example, entering THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS in the Topic field will return records that include the phrase LOOKING GLASS preceeded by any two words. The stopwords THROUGH and THE are treated as wildcards that match any two words.

Because stopwords are not explicitly searchable, you should not enter search phrases composed entirely of stopwords. Such searches will return no results.

The following words are considered stopwords. Note that this list is subject to change.

    A
    ABOUT
    ABOVE
    ACCORDING
    ACROSS
    ACTUAL
    ADDED
    AFTER
    AGAINST
    AHEAD
    ALL
    ALMOST
    ALONE
    ALONG
    ALSO
    AMONG
    AMONGST
    AN
    AND
    AND-OR
    AND/OR
    ANON
    ANOTHER
    ANY
    ARE
    ARISING
    AROUND
    AS
    AT
    AWARD
    AWAY
    BE
    BECAUSE
    BECOME
    BECOMES
    BEEN
    BEFORE
    BEHIND
    BEING
    BELOW
    BEST
    BETTER
    BETWEEN
    BEYOND
    BIRTHDAY
    BOTH
    BUT
    BY
    CAN
    CERTAIN
    COME
    COMES
    COMING
    COMPLETELY
    CONCERNING
    CONSIDER
    CONSIDERED
    CONSIDERING
    CONSISTING
    DE
    DEPARTMENT
    DER
    DESPITE
    DISCUSSION
    DO
    DOES
    DOESNT
    DOING
    DOWN
    DR
    DU
    DUE
    DURING
    EACH
    EITHER
    ESPECIALLY
    ET
    FEW
    FOR
    FORWARD
    FROM
    FURTHER
    GET
    GIVE
    GIVEN
    GIVING
    HAS
    HAVE
    HAVING
    HIS
    HONOR
    HOW
    IN
    INSIDE
    INSTEAD
    INTO
    IS
    IT
    ITEMS
    ITS
    JUST
    LET
    LETS
    LITTLE
    LOOK
    LOOKS
    MADE
    MAKE
    MAKES
    MAKING
    MANY
    MEET
    MEETS
    MORE
    MOST
    MUCH
    MUST
    MY
    NEAR
    NEARLY
    NEXT
    NOT
    NOW
    OF
    OFF
    ON
    ONLY
    ONTO
    OR
    OTHER
    OUR
    OUT
    OUTSIDE
    OVER
    OVERALL
    PER
    POSSIBLY
    PT
    PUT
    REALLY
    REGARDING
    REPRINTED
    SAME
    SEEN
    SEVERAL
    SHOULD
    SHOWN
    SINCE
    SO-CALLED
    SOME
    SPP
    STUDIES
    STUDY
    SUCH
    TAKE
    TAKEN
    TAKES
    TAKING
    THAN
    THAT
    THE
    THEIR
    THEM
    THEN
    THERE
    THEREFROM
    THESE
    THEY
    THIS
    THOSE
    THROUGH
    THROUGHOUT
    TO
    TOGETHER
    TOWARD
    TOWARDS
    UNDER
    UNDERGOING
    UP
    UPON
    UPWARD
    VARIOUS
    VERSUS
    VERY
    VIA
    VOL
    VOLS
    VS
    WAS
    WAY
    WAYS
    WE
    WERE
    WHAT
    WHATS
    WHEN
    WHERE
    WHICH
    WHILE
    WHITHER
    WHO
    WHOM
    WHOS
    WHOSE
    WHY
    WITH
    WITHIN
    WITHOUT
    YET
    YOU
    YOUR


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Disallowed Words in Address Field

Some words and abbreviations occur so frequently in addresses that searching on these words by themselves is disallowed. For example, entering UNIV by itself in the Address field, would search for every record in which at least one author had a university address containing the UNIV abbreviation. The number of results returned would be so large as to be useless.

For this reason, using any of these words or abbreviations by themselves in the Address field will generate an error that will alert you to re-specify your search terms. Joining disallowed words with the OR operator also generates an error, unless the words are used in conjunction with an allowed word. For example, you may not search for UNIV OR PENN, but you may search for UNIV PENN OR UNIV PA.

The following words are, by default, disallowed in the Address field. Note that the list is configurable and therefore may be different at your site.

    CHEM
    COLL
    CTR
    D
    DEPT
    DIV
    ENGN
    HOSP
    INST
    LAB
    MED
    PHYS
    RES
    SCH
    SCI
    ST
    UNIV


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Cited Reference Search

Cited reference searching enables you to find articles from journals that have cited a book, a patent or another article. Through a cited reference search, you can discover how a known idea or innovation has been confirmed, applied, improved, extended or corrected. In the Arts & Humanities Citation Index, cited reference searching also enables you to find articles that make reference to and/or include an illustration of a particular work of art or piece of music.

To learn more about cited reference searching and to see sample searches in the Web of Science and the ISI Citation Indexes on CD, see the Cited Reference Primer.

To do a cited reference search:

  1. Enter values in the search fields on the Cited Reference Lookup screen.
  2. Click Lookup to display the references that match your search criteria. (Note that the number of references shown can be limited by your site administrator; you will receive a warning if your search results exceed the limit.)
  3. On the Cited Reference Selection screen, select references of interest.
  4. Click Search to search for articles that cite the selected references.

For example, to search for articles that have cited the book Grammatology by Jacques Derrida:

  1. Enter DERRIDA J* in the Cited Author field. It is advisable to truncate after the first initial in case the author uses a second given name or initial.
  2. Enter GRAMMA* in the Cited Work field. By truncating the book's title, you can find references that contain different spellings of the book's title.
  3. Click Lookup.
  4. Click Select All to select all the references with J Derrida as the cited author and Grammatology (or its variants) as the cited work.
  5. Click Next Ten. Click Select All again. Repeat this until you come to the end of the list. (You may reach a limit to the number of references you can select for a search. If this happens, you should limit the file depth to just one or two years of data before doing the cited reference search.)
  6. Click Search.
  7. The Cited Reference Search Results -- Summary screen displays. These are the articles that cite Grammatology by J. Derrida.


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Cited Reference Lookup


Cited Author

Enter the last name of the work's first listed author. If the name is longer than 15 characters, truncate after the fifteenth character. Follow the last name with a space and up to 3 initials. It is advisable to use only the first initial followed by an asterisk. For example:

    Enter DEMAN P* to look up references to works where P DEMAN is listed as the first author.

    Enter MANNING GH to look up references works where GH MANNING is listed as the first author.

    Enter HAMBLETON G* OR RUSSELL R* to look up references to works where either G HAMBLETON or RL RUSSELL is listed as the first author.

If the author's last name includes punctuation marks or spaces, enter the name both with and without spaces, joining the two versions of the name with OR. For example,

    Enter DEVILLE OR DE VILLE for de Ville.

    Enter OBRIAN OR O BRIAN for O'Brian.

    Enter KROLLSMITH OR KROLL SMITH for Kroll-Smith.

Cited Work

For journals, enter an abbreviated journal title. Use the journal abbreviation list as a guide. It is advisable to truncate, even if you cut and paste from that list. For example:

    Enter ACAD* MED* to look up references to articles published in the journal Academic Medicine.

    Enter J AM CHEM* OR J AMER CHEM* OR JACS* to look up references to articles published in the journal Journal of the American Chemical Society.

    Enter MARKET* SCI* to look up references to articles published in the journal Marketing Science.

    Enter NATURE* to look up references to articles published in the journal Nature, Nature Genetics, or Nature Medicine.

For books, enter the first significant word or words of the title. It is advisable to truncate because of variant spellings. Also, titles of cited works may be in languages other than English. Always truncate the last word. For example:

    Enter STRU* ANTHR* to look up references to the book Structural Anthropology.

    Enter LISTEN* PROZAC* to look up references to the book Listening to Prozac.

    Enter HENS TEETH* to look up references to the book Hen's Teeth and Horse's Toes.

For patents, enter the patent number. Do not specify a country code. For example:

    Enter 5015744 to look up references to patent number 5015744.

Cited Year

Enter a four-digit year or series of years separated by the OR operator to indicate when the work was published (for patents, use the date of issue).

For example:

    Enter 1995 if you know the work was published in that year.

    Enter 1994 OR 1995 OR 1996 if you think the work was published within a year of 1995.

Basic rules for entering data are as follows:

  • Use upper, lower, or mixed case
    For example, enter RUSSELL, Russell, or russell.
  • Use quotation marks around the words AND, OR, NOT, SAME, or SENT when you do not intend these words to serve as search operators.
    For example, to search for works authored by William Or, enter "OR" W. To search for works authored by O. R. Koechli, enter KOECHLI "OR".
  • Use the asterisk as a wildcard to search for variants or alternate spellings of words.
    For example, enter ENZYM* to search for words that start with these letters but end with any group of letters (e.g., ENZYME, ENZYMATIC, ENZYMOLOGY).


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Cited Reference Selection

This screen displays the results of your Cited Reference Lookup. It lists all the cited references in the database that satisfy the cited author, cited work, and cited year criteria you entered. Each reference that appears is cited by at least one article in the Web of Science.

The references are listed 10 at a time, sorted alphabetically by cited author and then by cited work. Your site administrator may limit the total number of references that display.

The number in the Hits column to the left of each reference indicates the number of articles that cite the reference in all years of the Web of Science currently available. Consequently, when you click Search, the number of citing articles you retrieve may not match the number of Hits in the Cited Reference Selection if

  • You limited the time span at the start of your session and/or
  • Your institution does not subscribe to all the years of the Web of Science available

To retrieve records of the citing articles:

  • Select the reference(s) of interest checking the box beside the name of each item.
  • Click "Set limits and sort option" if you want to limit your search to articles in a given language or of a given document type. Note that multiple languages and document types may be selected.
  • Click "Set limits and sort option" if you want to specify how your search results will be sorted. The default sort is Latest Date, but you may select Relevance, First Author, Times Cited, or Source Title instead. Sorting by relevance places at the top of the list those articles that cite the largest number of selected references (i.e. an article that cites 10 of the works you have selected will appear in the list before an article that cites only 9).
  • Click Search.


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Cited Reference Search Results

This screen displays the results of the second step of your cited reference search: it lists articles whose reference lists include the work(s) you selected on the Cited Reference Selection screen. These articles are presumed to be related in subject to the works you selected, since they cite one or more of these work(s).

Records are sorted in relevance order, with those records that include the highest number of selected references appearing first (e.g., if you have selected 10 references on the Cited Reference Selection screen, any records whose reference lists include all 10 of these references will be listed first).

To navigate through this list
Click the navigation arrows or the page numbers to move through the data.
To print this list
Use the print option of your web browser.
To view individual records in the list
Click any item in the list.
To mark or unmark all 10 records displayed on the page
Click Mark All. Note: To clear all marked records and begin a new search session, click the "Home" button, then "New Session."
To print, export, or order individual records in the list
  1. Click the checkbox to the left of the author name to select an article.
  2. Submit your selection(s) by clicking Submit.
  3. Click Marked List and follow the instructions on the Marked Record screen.


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Cited Lookup Limit

For performance reasons, your site administrator can specify the maximum number of citations returned by a Cited Reference Lookup (the first step of the cited reference search). If your citation list exceeds this maximum, you will be notified and given the opportunity to refine your search criteria.

For example, entering DARWIN as a cited author will return many more citations than most site administrators allow. A search such as this will result in the following message:

NOTICE: Your Cited Reference Lookup found xxx matching references. You can further refine your lookup by adding additional terms and pressing the Lookup button. Your site is limited to xxx matching references. To view them now press Show.

Respond to such a message by:

  • Specifying additional search values such as a cited work and/or cited year to restrict the number of records returned and clicking Lookup again.
  • Clicking Show to display as much of your list as the site limit allows. This list will be displayed 10 records at a time, sorted by cited author and cited work, but it will be incomplete. You will see the maximum number of allowed records given in parenthesis at the end of the information line that displays below the screen title (e.g., (500 shown)).


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First Listed Author

The Cited Author in a cited reference is the first listed author of the cited item. When you do a cited reference search, you should therefore enter the name of the first author of the work as the Cited Author in the Cited Reference Lookup.

If the citation refers to a journal article published during the time span covered by the Web of Science, you can enter the name of any of its authors. When you click Lookup, you will see the name preceded by an ellipsis in the Cited Reference Selection Table. This only works for references to journal articles that have been indexed for the ISI Citation Databases. It is recommended that you repeat the search specifying the first author of the article as the Cited Author. This way, you will catch all the variations of the cited item that might be in the database.


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Arts & Humanities Index - Implicit Citations

A unique feature of ISI's Arts & Humanities Citation Index is that it includes citations to works of art (paintings, photographs, architectural drawings, musical scores) that are mentioned or reproduced in an article but not formally cited by the article's author(s). For example, an article that analyzes the structure of a Bach cantata may not explicitly reference the cantata in a footnote or endnote. But ISI creates a reference to this work and adds it to the list of references cited by the article. As a result, you can use the Cited Reference Search option to search for the article by entering BACH J* as the cited author and CANTAT* as the cited work.

Keep in mind that cited works may be in a language other than English. Thus, for example, to do a cited reference search on Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus, you should enter DOCT* OR DOKT* in the Cited Work Lookup field to match Doctor, Docteur, and Doktor.

Implicit citations appear on the Cited Reference Selection screen with cited author (musician, artist, etc.) and cited work listed. The volume field contains the code IMP to indicate an implicit citation.

The following codes appear in the volume field to indicate that the citing article contains a reproduction of the cited creative work:

  • ILL - Illustration
  • MUS - Musical Score


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Abstracts

English-language abstracts written by the author are included in the Science Citation Index Expanded and Social Sciences Citation Index for all articles where one is provided with the original publication. The full text of the abstract can be searched, viewed, printed, and exported.


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Cited Books

Since many of the articles covered in the Citation Databases cite non-periodical literature such as books, you can perform Cited Reference Searches on book titles. These titles are abbreviated in the database using a list of abbreviations.

You should identify a book by entering the name of the first listed author in the Cited Author field and the abbreviated first word or words of the title in the Cited Work field. If you are not sure if or how a word has been abbreviated, enter the first few letters of the word, followed by an asterisk. For example, to search for records of articles that cite Edith Hamilton's book Mythology, you might enter HAMILTON E* in the Cited Author field and MYTH* in the Cited Work field. This search would find the work whether or not its title has been abbreviated.


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Cited Patents

Since some of the articles covered in the Science Citation Index Expanded database cite patents, you can perform Cited Reference Searches on patents. Enter the patent's first author in the Cited Author field, the patent number in the Cited Work field, and the date of issue in the Cited Year field. All three items of information are not necessarily required to identify a patent.

For example, to find the 1912 U.S. patent number 1030304 by H. Hollerith, you could enter 1030304 in the Cited Work field.


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Keywords

Authors frequently provide a list of keywords or terms that they feel best represent the content of the papers. These keywords are contained in the ISI record for each article and are searchable. In addition, ISI generates KeyWords Plus for many articles. KeyWords Plus are words or phrases that frequently appear in the titles of an article's references, but do not appear in the title of the article itself. KeyWords Plus may be present for articles that have no author keywords, or may include important terms not listed among the author keywords.


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Document Types

Records in the ISI database include a document type indicator that categorizes articles using content/format categories such as Article, Book Review, Editorial, Letter, Correction. You may limit your search by selecting a single document type or group of document types. The default selection is all document types.

Document types are:

Art Exhibit Review
Article
Bibliography
Book Review
Chronology
Contents
Correction, Addition
Dance Performance Review
Database Review
Discussion
Editorial
Excerpt
Fiction, Creative Prose
Film Review
Hardware Review
Item About An Individual
Letter
Meeting Abstract
Music Performance Review
Music Score
Music Score Review
Note
Poetry
Press Digest
Record Review
Reprint
Review, Bibliography
Script
Software Review
Theater Review
TV Review, Radio Review, Video Review


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Languages

Records in the ISI database include a language indicator that categorizes articles by the language in which they are written, with articles in more than one language categorized as Multilanguage. You may limit your search by selecting a single language or a list of languages. The default selection is all languages.

Languages are:

Afrikaans
Arabic
Bengali
Bulgarian
Byelorussian
Catalan
Chinese
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Estonian
Finnish
Flemish
French
Gaelic
Galician
Georgian
German
Greek
Hebrew
Hungarian
Icelandic
Italian
Japanese
Korean
Latin
Latvian
Lithuanian
Macedonian
Malay
Multilanguage
Norwegian
Persian
Polish
Portuguese
Provencal
Rumanian
Russian
Serbian
Serbo-Croatian
Slovak
Slovene
Spanish
Swedish
Turkish
Ukrainian
Welsh


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Wildcards

The question mark ( ? ) and asterisk ( * ) characters are called wildcards because they can be included in a search term to represent unknown characters. The question mark represents any single character. The asterisk represents any group of characters, including no characters.

Wildcards can be used in any Easy Search, General Search, or Cited Reference Search field, as long as you observe the following restrictions:

  • Wildcards may be used within and at the ends of search terms, but not at the beginning (e.g., SUL*UR and BIOLOG* are allowed, but not *NATAL).
  • In the Topic field, the asterisk wildcard must be preceded by at least three letters (e.g., BIO* is allowed, but not B* or BI*). Note that the number of characters required before the asterisk is configurable and may be different at your site.
  • Only two wildcards can be used within a single word, and when two wildcards are used, the word will be truncated after the second wildcard.

Asterisk (*) Examples

At ends of terms:

  • You can use the asterisk to replace the end of a word when you want to search for all possible endings of a given root. For example, enter BIOLOG* to search for words that start with BIOLOG and end with any character or group of characters (e.g., BIOLOGY, BIOLOGIST, BIOLOGISTS, BIOLOGICAL).
  • You can use the asterisk after an author's first initial to search for the name if you don't know the other initials, or whether the author has more than one initial. For example, enter KELLOG S* to search for works by authors whose last name is KELLOG, whose first name starts with an S, and who may or may not have other initials (e.g., KELLOG S, KELLOG SA, KELLOG, STA).
  • You can use the asterisk in the SOURCE TITLE or CITED WORK fields when you don't know an exact journal title. For example, enter COMPUT* to search for journals whose titles begin with words such as COMPUTE, COMPUTER, COMPUTERS, COMPUTING, COMPUTATION, COMPUTATIONAL, COMPUTATIONS.

In the middle of terms:

  • You can use the asterisk in the middle of terms to search for terms that have alternate spellings. For example, enter SUL*UR to search for SULPHUR or SULFUR.
  • You can use the asterisk in the middle of an author's name when you are unsure of the spelling. For example, enter HOF*MAN to search for HOFMAN or HOFFMAN.

Use the asterisk wildcard carefully so that it does not broaden your search more than you intend. Very broad searches not only take time, they may return many more records than you are willing to look through. For example, entering CELL* as a search term in the Topic field when no other search values are used will retrieve any record in the selected database(s) containing any word starting with CELL in the title, keyword, or abstract field. The resulting list will be huge. Using this Topic search term in conjunction with an author name and perhaps a source title would result in a more effective, well-focused search.

Question Mark(?) Examples

At ends of terms:

  • You can use the question mark to search for variant single letter endings. For example, enter BARTHOLD? to search for BARTHOLDY or BARTHOLDI.

In the middle of terms:

  • You can use the question mark to search for variant spellings. For example, enter EN?OBLAST to search for ENDOBLAST and ENTOBLAST.


Help Contents
Search Operators

Search operators are special words you can include in search fields to indicate logical relationships between multiple terms. For example, you can search for jointly authored articles by putting both author names in the General Search Author field, joined by the logical operator AND (e.g., JONES CR AND SMITH CW).

Search operators must be separated from other items in a search field by either spaces or angle brackets. For example, APPLES AND ORANGES or APPLES & ORANGES are valid search values, but APPLES AND ORANGES is not.

The search operators supported by the Citation Databases are:

  • AND - all terms joined by AND must occur in the field for a record to be selected
  • OR - any one of the terms joined by OR must occur in the field for a record to be selected
  • NOT - the term following NOT must be absent from the field for the record to be selected.
  • SAME - the terms joined by SAME must occur within the same sentence (where sentence is understood to be a period-delimited string) for the record to be selected.
  • SENT - (identical to the SAME operator) the terms joined by SENT must occur within the same sentence (where sentence is understood to be a period-delimited string) for the record to be selected.

These search operators may be used in the following fields on the Easy Search, General Search, and Cited Reference Search screens:

  • Easy Search - Topic - All operators
  • Easy Search - Person - AND, OR, NOT
  • Easy Search - Place - All operators
  • General Search - Topic - All operators
  • General Search - Author - AND, OR, NOT
  • General Search - Source Title - All operators
  • General Search - Address - All operators
  • Cited Reference Search - Cited Author - OR
  • Cited Reference Search - Cited Work - OR
  • Cited Reference Search - Cited Year - OR

You may use more than one search operator in a field. For example, you could enter AIDS OR HIV OR ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME OR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS in the General Search Topic field to search for records containing any one of these words or phrases.

If you use several different operators in the same field, you should use parentheses to indicate which operators should be evaluated first. Without parentheses, operators are evaluated in the following order, from highest to lowest precedence:
SAME and SENT
NOT
AND
OR

Since NOT is evaluated before AND or OR, you will need to use parentheses in any search expression where you want AND or OR to be evaluated first. For example, if you wanted to search for all records containing the word SUICIDE, but not records containing either the phrase DOCTOR-ASSISTED or PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED, you would enter SUICIDE NOT (DOCTOR-ASSISTED OR PHYSICIAN-ASSISTED) in the General Search Topic field. The parentheses indicate that the OR operator should be evaluated first.

Examples:

AND

  • Enter GORBACHEV AND YELTSIN to search for records containing both words.

OR

  • Enter GORBACHEV OR YELTSIN to search for records containing either GORBACHEV or YELTSIN, including those records that contain both terms.

NOT

  • Enter GORBACHEV NOT YELTSIN to search for records containing GORBACHEV but not containing YELTSIN.

SAME

  • Enter GORBACHEV SAME YELTSIN to search for records containing the words GORBACHEV and YELTSIN in the same sentence. Note that the order in which these words appear is not dictated by the SAME operator.

OPERATOR COMBINATIONS

  • Enter (HONEY BEE* OR HONEYBEE* OR APIS MELLIFERA) SAME DANC* to search for records containing any one of the words or phrases in parenthesis (e.g., HONEY BEE, HONEY BEES, HONEYBEE, HONEYBEES, APIS MELLIFERA) in the same sentence as any word beginning with the letters DANC (e.g. DANCE, DANCES, DANCING).


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Running and Saving Queries

If you run the same General or Cited Reference searches frequently, you should save your search parameters using the Save Query button available on both the General Search and Cited Reference Search screens. Saved queries can easily be retrieved and rerun, saving you the trouble of reselecting search parameters.

The procedures for saving and running queries differ based on your site's configuration:


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Saving Queries (Client)

You can use the Save Query button on either the General Search or Cited Reference Search screen to save queries so that you can run them again in other sessions against the same or different data. Queries saved on the client include only your search parameters and are run against whatever database and time span selections you have established in the current session.

Queries are saved as disk files in any disk or directory location you specify (e.g., in any directory on your local hard disk or network server or on a floppy disk). These files may have any name that conforms to the conventions of your operating system, but you should use a name that will make the file easy to identify when you want to rerun the query.

If your browser's file open function looks by default for files with an .HTM extension, your saved file will be easier to find if you use this extension (e.g., QUERY.HTM). Avoid giving saved queries an .EXE extension, as this will prevent some browsers from retrieving the file.

Microsoft Explorer users click here for alternate Save Query instructions.

To save a query:

  1. Click Save Query.
  2. Specify a file name and location in the file save dialog.
  3. Exit the dialog.

To delete a query:

  1. Delete the saved query files.


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Running Queries (Client)

If you have used the Save Query button on either the General Search or Cited Reference Search screen to save queries, you can retrieve these queries and run them again using the file open option of your browser. To run a previously saved query, you must know the name and location of the file you created when you saved the query.

To run a query:

  1. Use your browser's file open function to select the file containing the query.
  2. A General Search or Cited Reference Search screen will display with search values already selected.
  3. Edit the search values if you like or leave them as is to repeat the same search against whatever database and time span is currently selected.
  4. Click Search or Lookup to execute the search.


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Microsoft Explorer Notes

A problem in Microsoft Explorer prevents the Save Query button from displaying a File Save dialog. To save a query using Explorer, follow these steps:

  1. After executing your search, use the Web of Science toolbar General Search or Cited Reference Search buttons to return to the search page you just used.
  2. From the browser menu bar, select File: Save As. Type a filename (filename.htm) and select a location to save the file. The search query is saved to the selected location.
  3. To run the saved search query, follow the instructions above.


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Saving Queries (Server)

You can use the Save Query button on either the General Search or Cited Reference Search screen to save queries so that you can run them again in other sessions against the same or different data. Queries saved on the server include only your search parameters and are run against whatever database and time span selections you have established in the current session.

Since all queries are saved on the server, you will need to select a user name and password to distinguish your saved queries from those of other users. Remember the user name and password you select, because they will be required to retrieve the queries you save.

To save a query:

  1. Click Save Query on either the General Search or Cited Reference Search screen. The Save Search Query screen displays.
  2. Enter a user name and password. The user name must be unique. You will receive an error if you enter a name that has already been selected by another user.
  3. Click Continue. The bottom half of the screen will display a data entry field.
  4. Enter a unique name for the search query.
  5. Click Continue to save the query.
  6. Click either the General Search or Cited Ref Search button in the toolbar to return to the Search screen and execute your query.


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Running Queries (Server)

If you have used the Save Query button on either the General Search or Cited Reference Search screen to save queries, you can retrieve these queries and run them again using the Run Saved Query button on the Full Search screen. To run a previously saved query, you must know the user name, password, and query name that were specified when the query was saved.

To run a query:

  1. Click Run Saved Query on the Full Search screen. The Run Saved Search Query screen will display.
  2. Enter the user name and password you used when you saved the query.
  3. Click Continue. The bottom half of the screen will display a list of saved queries.
  4. Select a query from the displayed list.
  5. Click Continue.
  6. A General Search or Cited Reference Search screen will display with search values already selected.
  7. Edit these values if you like or leave them as is to repeat the same search against whatever database and time span is currently selected.
  8. Click Search or Lookup to execute the search.

You may delete saved queries by following the first four steps outlined above and clicking Delete Query instead of Continue.


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Flowchart of Results Pages

This flowchart shows the relationship among the results screens. The white boxes on the upper left represent the search screens, and are the starting point of the flowchart.

Summary pages - list results in a bibliographic format. The title of each record is a link to its full record. The four types of summary pages are:

Search Results - Lists the articles that match your search.
Cited References - Lists the references of the article (full record) displayed.
Related Records - Lists similar articles that share common references with the article (full record) displayed.
Citing Articles - Lists articles that reference the article (full record) displayed.

Full record pages - contain complete bibliographic information, the abstract, keywords, Keywords Plus, and publisher information. From any full record, you can access the summary pages for Cited References, Related Records, and Citing Articles.


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Full Record Screen

The Full Record screen displays information contained in the ISI database about an article, with search terms highlighted. For example, if a record was located by entering MAD COW DISEASE in the Topic field on the General Search screen, this phrase will be highlighted wherever it appears in the record.

Note that the ISI database does not contain the complete text of the article. Instead it contains a summary record for each article that includes some or all of the following fields, depending on the database you have selected.

Use the options on this screen to:

  • Mark the record to print, export, or order the full text of the document.
  • Unmark the record. Note: To clear all marked records and begin a new search session, click the "Home" button, then "New Session."
  • Display the works listed in this article's cited reference list.
  • Display a list of articles that have cited this work in their reference lists.
  • Search for other articles whose cited reference lists include some of the same works as this article's reference list.
  • Navigate through the search results list.

Information Available in Full Record

Article title, source title, ISSN, volume, issue, publication date, page range and count, publisher, publisher's address, publisher's e-mail address, complete list of authors, authors' addresses, author's e-mail address, reprint address, document type, language, references, abstract, author-provided keyword list, additional keyword list (KeyWords Plus®), and ISI document delivery number.

To mark the record for printing, exporting, or ordering
Click Mark. Then click Marked List to display the print, export, and order options.

Note that using your web browser's print option to print the Full Record page will also generate a printed copy of the record; however, this copy will also contain all the graphics and other interface items that display on the screen.

To unmark the record, removing it from your marked list
Click Unmark. Note that the Unmark button displays only if the record has already been marked. Note: To clear all marked records and begin a new search session, click the "Home" button, then "New Session."
To display the works listed in this article's cited reference list
Click Cited References. If the number zero or NK (for Not Keyed) displays beside the Cited References link, the link will not be active because the article either has no references or the references were not keyed into the database (as is the case with articles that are themselves bibliographies).
To display a list of other articles that have cited this article
Click Times Cited to open the Citing Articles page. If the number zero displays beside the Times Cited link, no articles covered in the currently loaded databases cite this article, and the link will not be active.
To search for other articles whose cited reference lists include at least one of the same sources as this article
Click Related Records.
To navigate through the search results list
Click Next or Previous to move to the next or previous record in the list. Click Summary to return to the summary list.


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Cited References

The Cited References screen displays the cited reference list of the article whose name appears at the top of the screen. References are underlined if a record for the source exists in the currently loaded ISI databases.

To return to the previous full record
Click the article title at the top of the screen.
To return to the original full record
Click the Search Results button on the button bar.
To display the full record of an underlined reference
Click the underlined item.
To print this list of cited references
Use the print option of your Web browser.
To search for articles whose reference lists include some or all of the items in this list
Review the list, clearing the checkbox to the left of an item if you do not want to search for articles that cite the item. Then click Related Records.


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Citing Articles Summary

The Citing Articles Summary screen displays a list of articles whose reference lists include the article named at the top of the screen. All items on the summary list are underlined, since a full record for each article exists in the ISI database.

To return to the previous full record
Click the article title at the top of the screen.
To return to the original full record
Click the Search Results button on the button bar.
To display the full record of an underlined article
Click the underlined item.

Cited reference searching enables you to locate information on a given topic by using a representative or seminal work on the topic to search for other works on the same topic. The assumption is that articles that cite this seminal work must be related to it in subject matter.

You can also use cited reference searching to:

  • Discover who is citing your research.
  • Measure the influence of a colleague's or competitor's work.
  • Follow the direction of research based on an earlier study.


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Related Records Summary

The Related Records screen displays a list of articles whose cited reference lists include at least one of the sources cited by the original (parent) article, whose title appears at the top of the screen. Articles that share the largest number of sources with the original article are listed first.

To return to the original full record
Click the Search Results button on the button bar.
To navigate through this list
Click the navigation arrows or the page numbers to move through the data.
To print this list
Use the print option of your web browser.
To view individual records in the list
Click any item in the list.
To mark or unmark all 10 records displayed on the page
Click Mark All.
To print, export, or order individual records in the list
  1. Click the checkbox to the left of the author name to select an article.
  2. Submit your selection(s) by clicking either Submit or the navigation arrows.
  3. Click Marked List and follow the instructions on the Marked Record screen.
To return to the full record of the parent article
Click the article title at the top of the screen.

The assumption behind related record searching is that articles whose reference lists include some of the same sources have a subject relationship, regardless of whether their titles, abstracts, or keywords contain the same terms. The more sources two articles have in common, the closer this subject relationship is presumed to be.

Take this example:

  • Assume your General Search on the topic honey bees has located a record for an article by C Dreller entitled "The sense of hearing in honey-bees."
  • When you click on this record on the General Search Results Summary screen, you find by reading the abstract that the article contains exactly the information you were looking for.
  • You click Cited References to look at the article's cited reference list.
  • All 30 references look relevant to your work, so you leave all the items checked (the default), and click Related Records.
  • The Related Records Summary screen displays a list of articles whose reference lists include at least one of the items cited by the original article. Some of these articles are familiar to you because they showed up in your initial General Search. But some of the articles are new to you.
  • You click on the first new article in this list to look at the full record, and then click Cited References to display its reference list, which turns out to contain many of the same items as your original article. Chances are good that this article is also relevant to your research, but because neither its title, abstract, nor keyword list contained the term honey bees, you did not find the article in your original topic search.
  • You mark this record for printing and continue to look at the other new articles on the list. As you move down the list, the articles have fewer and fewer references in common with your original article and are therefore less relevant to your work.


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Marked Records for Printing, Exporting, and Ordering

The Marked Records screen displays a list of the records you have marked by clicking the checkbox beside an article on a summary result screen or by clicking Mark on a Full Record screen.

Use the options on this screen to:

  • Print records, with one bibliographic record per page.
  • Export records directly into a ProCite or Reference Manager database.
  • Save records in file whose format is suitable for import into a bibliographic management program.
  • Order the full text of the article identified by any record.

Note: To clear all marked records and begin a new search session, click the "Home" button, then "New Session."


Help Contents
Printing Records

To print records:

  1. Review the records on the screen to determine which records you want to print. Uncheck the box beside any record you do not want to print.
  2. Select the bibliographic information you want to print in each record by clicking "Select fields" and checking boxes beside the field names you want. Note that the author, title, and source fields always print.
  3. Determine the order of the printed records by clicking "Set sort option" and selecting a sort option:

    Latest Date Sorts records by the date on which the documents were processed at ISI, with the most recently processed records listed first.
    First Author Sorts records in alphabetical order by the last name of the first listed author.
    Source Title Sorts records in alphabetical order by source (e.g., journal) title.
    Times Cited Sorts records by importance based on how many times the record has been cited by other articles.

  4. Click "Format for Print". An HTML page will display with the records and fields you have selected.
  5. Print this page using the print option of your web browser. The resulting printed output corresponds in content and format to what you see on the screen. Each record starts on a new page.


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Exporting Records

If you have Research Information System's ProCite or Reference Manager and have installed the appropriate ISI/RIS Web Capture utility, you can export marked records directly into a ProCite or Reference Manager database.

To export records directly to ProCite or Reference Manager:

  1. Review the records on the screen to determine which records you want to export. Uncheck the box beside any record you do not want to export.
  2. Select the bibliographic information you want to export in each record by clicking "Select fields" and checking boxes beside the field names you want. Note that the author, title, and source fields are always exported.
  3. Determine the order of exported records by clicking "Set sort option" and selecting a sort option:

    Latest Date Sorts records by the date on which the documents were processed at ISI, with the most recently processed records listed first.
    First Author Sorts records in alphabetical order by the last name of the first listed author.
    Source Title Sorts records in alphabetical order by source (e.g., journal) title.
    Times Cited Sorts records by importance based on how many times the record has been cited by other articles.

  4. Click Export to launch the Web Capture application.


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Saving Records to a File

To save records to a file suitable for import by a bibliographic management software package:

  1. Review the records on the screen to determine which records you want to save. Uncheck the box beside any record you do not want to save.
  2. Select the bibliographic information you want to save in each record by clicking "Select fields" and checking boxes beside the field names you want. Note that the author, title, and source fields are always saved.
  3. Determine the order of records in the saved file by clicking "Set sort option" and selecting a sort option:

    Latest Date Sorts records by the date on which the documents were processed at ISI, with the most recently processed records listed first.
    First Author Sorts records in alphabetical order by the last name of the first listed author.
    Source Title Sorts records in alphabetical order by source (e.g., journal) title.
    Times Cited Sorts records by importance based on how many times the record has been cited by other articles.

  4. Click "Save to File". Your browser's file save dialog will display.
  5. Specify a path and file name in this dialog. When you exit the dialog, a file will be saved containing the fields and records you specified, with fields identified by tags. Sample exported record.


Help Contents
Ordering Records

Using the "Format for Document Delivery" button, you can order the full text of any article. This button will not display if you do not have a document ordering option in your configuration.

Note: Depending on your configuration, the "Format for Document Delivery" button will perform one of these three functions:

  • Open the ISI Document Solution document ordering web site. Your marked list is passed for easy document ordering. Refer to the instructions on that site for more information.
  • Open a third-party document ordering web site. Because the list of marked records are not sent to this site, you will need to enter the article information required by that site. Refer to the instructions on that site for more information.
  • Send an e-mail to a predetermined Web of Science site administrator requesting the full text of the articles listed on the Marked Records page.


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Sample Exported Record

ISI's export file format is illustrated in the following sample record. You will see bibliographic information such as this for each record on your marked list. Two-character tags identify each data element in the record. Records are separated by an ER (end of record) tag.

Each export file begins with two lines that identify the file type (FN) and version number (VR) of the export format.

FN ISI Generic Export Format
VR 1.0
PT J
AU Foster, JD
Hunter, N
Williams, A
Mylne, MJA
McKelvey, WAC
Hope, J
Fraser, H
Bostock, C
TI Observations on the transmission of scrapie in experiments using embryo transfer
SO VETERINARY RECORD
LA English
DT Article
NR 15
SN 0042-4900
PU BRITISH VETERINARY ASSOC
C1 INST ANIM HLTH, OGSTON BLDG, W MAINS RD, EDINBURGH EH9 3JF, MIDLOTHIAN, SCOTLAND.MRC, NEUROPATHOGENESIS UNIT, EDINBURGH EH9 3JF, MIDLOTHIAN, SCOTLAND.SCOTTISH AGR COLL, VET SERV DIV, PENICUIK, MIDLOTHIAN, SCOTLAND.INST ANIM HLTH, COMPTON LAB, READING RG16 0NN, BERKS, ENGLAND.
ID FIBRIL PROTEIN PRP; SIP GENE; SHEEP
AB This investigation studied the maternal transmission of scrapie in sheep by using embryo transfer to examine the viability of highly susceptible offspring derived from scrapie- affected and uninfected donors. The study also examined the effect of washing the embryos, Scrapie occurred in both washed and unwashed embryo-derived Sip sAsA progeny from both groups of donor ewes, As a result, the earlier observation that scrapie might pass via the unwashed embryo to develop as disease in adult sheep has to be reassessed. Several other implications of the work are considered, including the possibility that natural scrapie is not purely a genetic disease.
CR DICKINSON AG, 1974, V84, P19, J COMP PATHOL
DICKINSON AG, 1988, P63, NOVEL INFECTIOUS AGE
DICKINSON AG, 1976, P209, SLOW VIRUS DISEASES FOSTER JD, 1993, P229, TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGI FOSTER JD, 1992, V130, P341, VET REC FOSTER JD, 1991, V128, P548, VET REC GOLDMANN W, 1994, V75, P989, J GEN VIROL GOLDMANN W, 1991, V71, P2411, J GEN VIROL HADLOW WJ, 1982, V146, P657, J INFECT DIS HOURRIGAN J, 1979, V1, P331, SLOW TRANSMISSIBLE D HUNTER N, 1996, IN PRESS ARCH VIROLO HUNTER N, 1991, V72, P1287, J GEN VIROL HUNTER N, 1989, V124, P364, VET REC PARRY HB, 1962, V17, P75, HEREDITY STRINGFELLOW DA, 1990, P41, MANUAL INT EMBRYO TR
TC 0
BP 559
EP 562
PG 6
PY 1996
PD JUN 8
VL 138
IS 23
GA UR372
PI LONDON
RP Foster JD
ER


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Export Tags

Each export tag identifies a data element. Tags are not included unless the data elements they identify are present in the record.

FN File type
VR File format version number
PT Publication type (e.g., book, journal, book in series)
AU Author(s)
TI Article title
DE Author keywords
ID KeyWords Plus
AB Abstract
RP Reprint address
CI Research addresses
EM Authors' Internet e-mail address(es)
TC Times cited
NR Cited reference count
CR Cited references
CP Cited patent
BP Beginning page
EP Ending page
PG Page count
DT Document type
LA Language
SN ISSN
SO Full source title
J9 29-character source title abbreviation
JI ISO source title abbreviation
SE Book series title
BS Book series subtitle
PY Publication year
PD Publication date
VL Volume
IS Issue
PN Part number
SU Supplement
SI Special issue
GA ISI document delivery number
PU Publisher
PI Publisher city
PA Publisher address
WP Publisher web address
ER End of record


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Bibliographic Management Software

Bibliographic management software stores, manipulates, and prints out reference information in a variety of formats. Many of these software packages can import files containing reference information if the files are in the appropriate format. Since the required import format varies from product to product, you should consult the product documentation to determine whether your software can import ISI-generated files.


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ISI/RIS Web Capture Utility

To enable the Export button, you must install the ISI/RIS Web Capture utility available from Research Information Systems. After this utility is installed, and you have configured your browser to recognize the utility as a helper/viewer application, the Export button will launch a program that exports marked records directly into a ProCite or Reference Manager database.

Click here to download the Web Capture utility. Instructions for installing the utility are in the readme file that is included in the download. See your web browser documentation or help system for more information about setting up helper/viewer applications, also called plug-ins.

You may also contact RIS at:

Research Information Systems
2355 Camino Vida Roble
Carlsbad, CA 92009
619-438-5526
Fax: 619-438-5573
info@ris.risinc.com


Help Contents
Corporate & Institution Abbreviations

Corporate and institution names that appear in author addresses are frequently abbreviated, and you should use the abbreviations when entering search terms in the General Search or Place Search address fields. ISI abbreviates names based on the following list. Other address elements such as street address and department/division names and state/country names are also abbreviated.

To be sure that you enter the exact abbreviation, you can highlight the abbreviation and then use your browser's copy and paste functions to copy the abbreviation from this screen and paste it into the Address field on the General Search or Place Search screens.

Note that if the original publisher has abbreviated an address, it appears in the ISI database in this abbreviated form, which may not conform to ISI's standards for abbreviation.

Agricultural & Food Research Council

AFRC
Allgemeine Elektrische Gesellschaft Telefunken
AEG TELEFUNKEN
Aluminum Company of America
ALCOA
American Broadcasting Company
ABC
American Chemical Society
ACS
American Society for Testing and Materials
ASTM
American Federation Labor - Congress Industrial Organization
AFL CIO
Argonne National Laboratory
ANL
Association for Computing Machinery
ACM
Atomic Energy Research Establishment
AERE
Bad Anilin & Soda Fabrik AG
BASF AG
Brookhaven National Laboratory
BNL
California Institute of Technology
CALTECH
Centers for Disease Control
CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
CDCP
Centre Etudes Nucleaires Saclay
CENS
Centre Etudes Nucleaires
CEN
Centre Etudes Nucleaires Cadarache
CEN CADARACHE
Centre Etudes Nucleaires Fontenay aux Roses
CENFAR
Centre Etudes Nucleaires Grenoble
CEN GRENOBLE
Centre Etudes Nucleaires Studiecentrum Kerenergie
CEN SCK
Centre Etudes Recherche
CERN
Centre Hospitalier Regional
CHR
Centre Hospitalier Universitaire
CHU
Centre Nazionale Recherche Scientifique
CNRS
City University of New York
CUNY
Civil Aeronautics Board
CAB
Columbia Broadcasting System
CBS
Comitato Nazionale Energia Nucleaire
CNEN
Commission Energie Atomique
CEA
Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organization
CSIRO
Consejo Superior Investigaciones Cientificas
CSIC
Consiglio Nazionale Ricerche
CNR
Council of Scientific & Industrial Research
CSIR
Department of Scientific & Industrial Research
DSIR
Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron
DESY
Deutsche Forschung & Veruchanstalt Luft & Raunfahrt EV
DFVLR
E. I. DuPont de Nemours
DUPONT CO
Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule
ETH
Equipe Recherche
ER
Equipe Recherche Associe
ERA
European Atomic Energy Community
EURATOM
Federal Aviation Agency
FAA
Federal Communications Commission
FCC
Food & Agricultural Organization
FAO
Formation Recherche Associe
FRA
General Electric Co.
GE
General Electric Company, England
GEC
General Motors Corporation
GM CORP
Illinois Institute of Technology
IIT
Imperial Chemical Industries PLC
ICI PLC
Institute for Atomic Energy
IAE
Institute of Automobile Engineers
IAE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IEEE
Institute of Electronic Engineering
IEE
Institute National Recherche Agronomique
INRA
Institute National Sante & Recherche Medicale
INSERM
International Business Machines Corp.
IBM CORP
International Telephone & Telegraph Corporation
ITT CORP
Kernforschung Anlage Julich GMBH
KFA JULICH GMBH
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MIT
Medical Research Council
MRC
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food
MAFF
Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company
3M CO
National Aeronautics & Space Administration
NASA
National Broadcasting Company
NBC
National Cancer Institute
NCI
National Eye Institute
NEI
National Heart Lung & Blood Institute
NHLBI
National Institute Allergy & Infectious Diseases
NIAID
National Institute Arthritis Metabolism & Digestive Diseases
NIAMDD
National Institute Child Health & Human Development
NICHHD
National Institute Dental Research
NIDR
National Institute Mental Health
NIMH
National Institute Neurological & Communicative Disorders & Strokes
NINCDS
National Institutes of Health
NIH
National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration
NOAA
Natural Environment Research Council
NERC
New York University
NYU
Norges Tekniske Hogskole
NTH
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
ORNL
Office Recherche Scientifique & Technologique Outre Mer
ORSTOM
Public Health Service
PHS
Radio Corporation of America
RCA CORP
Royal Air Force
RAF
Science & Engineering Research Council
SERC
Skf Ball Bearings
SKF
SmithKline & French
SK&F
Society of Automotive Engineers
SAE
Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
SPIE
State University of New York
SUNY
Stichting Fundamenteel Onderzoek Materie
FOM
Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek
TNO
UN Educational Scientific & Cultural Organization
UNESCO
Unite Enseignement & Recherche
UER
United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority
UKAEA
United Nations
UN
University of Wales Institute of Science & Technology
UNWIST
US Air Force
USAF
US Army
USA
US Department of Agriculture
USDA
US Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service
USDA ARS
US Department of Agriculture Science & Education Administration
USDA SEA
US Department of Energy
US DOE
US Department of Health & Human Services
US DEPT HHS
US Department of Health Education & Welfare
US DEPT HEW
US Energy Research & Development Administration
US ERDA
US Environmental Protection Agency
US EPA
US Food & Drug Administration
US FDA
US Navy
USN
US Public Health Service
US PHS
World Health Organization
WHO


Help Contents
Address Abbreviations

Words that appear in author addresses are frequently abbreviated, and you should use the abbreviations when entering search terms in the General Search or Place Search address fields. ISI abbreviates address words based on the following list. Other address elements such as corporate and institution names and state/country names are also abbreviated.

To be sure that you enter the exact abbreviation, you can highlight the abbreviation and then use your browser's copy and paste functions to copy the abbreviation from this screen and paste it into the Address field on the General Search or Place Search screens.

Note that if the original publisher has abbreviated an address, it appears in the ISI database in this abbreviated form, which may not conform to ISI's standards for abbreviation.

Click on a letter to move through the abbreviation list alphabetically.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Abteilung
Abt
Academy
Acad
Accident
Accid
Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome
AIDS
Administration
Adm
Advance(d)
Adv
Aerospace
Aerosp
Agency
Agcy
Agriculture
Agr
Air Force
AF
Air Force Base
AFB
Akademy
Akad
America(n)
Amer
Analysis
Anal
Angewandte
Angew
Animal
Anim
Anthropol(any ending, e.g. Anthropology, Anthropologist)
Anthropol
Apparatus
Apparat
Applied
Appl
Arch(any ending, e.g. Archive, Archives)
Arch
Arthritis
Arthrit
Association
Assoc
Avenue
Ave
Behavior (al)
Behav
Bibliog(any ending, e.g. Bibliography, Bibliographies)
Bibliog
Biochemistry
Biochem
Biol(any ending, e.g. Biology, Biologist)
Biol
Botany
Bot
Boulevard
Blvd
Brothers
Bros
Building
Bldg
Bureau
Bur
Cancer
Canc
Center
Ctr
Central
Cent
Chem(any ending, e.g. Chemistry, Chemical)
Chem
Chimie
Chim
Chirurgie
Chirurg
Cientificas
Cient
Clin(any ending, e.g. Clinic, Clinical)
Clin
College
Coll
Comite
Com
Committee
Comm
Communication
Commun
Company
Co
Comparat(any ending, e.g. Comparative)
Comparat
Compounds
Cpds
Computer
Comp
Conference
Conf
Corporation
Corp
County
Cty
Defence
Def
Dental
Dent
Department
Dept
Deutsch
Deutsch
Development
Dev
Diabetes
Diabet
Diagnosis
Diag
Disease
Dis
District
Dist
Division
Div
Drive
Dr
East
E
Econ(any ending, e.g. Economy, Economist)
Econ
Education
Educ
Egyetem
Egyet
Electric/Electronic
Elect
Electroencephalographic
Eeg
Elektrische/Elektronik
Elekt
Engineering
Engn
Environment
Environm
Establishment/Establissement
Estab
Étude
Etud
Experiment(al)
Expt
Faculty
Fac
Fakulty
Fak
Farmacia
Farm
Federal
Fed
Fisica
Fis
Forschung
Forsch
Fort
Ft
Foundation
Fdn
Fysica
Fys
General
Gen
Gesellschaft
Gesell
Government
Govt
Graduate
Grad
Group
Grp
Health
Hlth
Heights
Hts
History
Hist
Hochschule
Hsch
Hogeskole
Hgsk
Hopital
Hop
Horticulture
Hort
Hospital
Hosp
Husbandry
Husb
Hygiene
Hyg
Incorporated
Inc
Industry
Ind
Infectious
Infect
Infirmary
Infirm
Ingegneria
Ingn
Institute
Inst
Istituto
Ist
International
Int
Intro(any ending, e.g. Introduction)
Intro
Investigation
Invest
Island
Isl
Junior
Jr
Kemiai
Kem
Klinik
Klin
Konference/Konferenz
Konf
Laboratories
Labs
Laboratory
Lab
Lecture
Lect
Library
Lib
Limited
Ltd
Maladies
Malad
Manufacturing
Mfg
Marketing
Mkt
Material
Mat
Mathematics
Math
Mechanical
Mech
Medecine
Med
Medicine
Med
Meditskkaya
Med
Medizin
Med
Memorial
Mem
Metabolic
Metab
Metal
Met
Military
Mil
Mining
Min
Ministry
Minist
Molecular/Molecule/Molekular
Mol
Mount
Mt
Nacional
Nacl
National
Natl
Natural
Nat
Navigation
Nav
Nazionale
Nazl
North
N
Northeast
Ne
Northern
No
Northwest
Nw
Nuclear
Nucl
Nuklear
Nukl
Nutrition
Nutr
Observatory
Observ
Obstetrics
Obstet
Office
Off
Organization
Org
Ospedale
Osped
Paediatrics
Paediat
Park
Pk
Parkway
Pkwy
Pediatrics
Pediat
Petroleum
Petr
Pharmaceut(any ending, e.g. Pharmaceutical, Pharmaceuticals)
Pharmaceut
Pharmacol(any ending, e.g. Pharmacology, Pharmacologist)
Pharmacol
Pharmacy
Pharm
Physiol(any ending, e.g. Physiology, Physiologist)
Physiol
Place
Pl
Post Office
Po
Post Office Box
Pob
Process
Proc
Products
Prod
Professor
Prof
Propulsion
Prop
Protein
Prot
Province
Prov
Psychiatry
Psychiat
Psychol(any ending, e.g. Psychology, Psychologist)
Psychol
Pulmonary
Pulm
Quimica
Quim
Radiat(any ending, e.g. Radiation)
Radiat
Recherche
Rech
Rehabilitation
Rehabil
Reproduction
Reprod
Research
Res
Respiratory
Resp
Ricerca
Ric
Road
Rd
Saint
St
Sanatorium
Sanat
Sanitary
Sanit
School
Sch
Science
Sci
Semiconductor
Semicond
Service
Serv
Society
Soc
South
S
Southeast
Se
Southern
So
Southwest
Sw
Spectroscopy
Spect
Square
Sq
Standard
Stand
Station
Stn
Statistics
Stat
Strasse
Str
Street
St
Structure
Struct
Substance
Subst
Superior
Super
Surgery
Surg
Synthesis
Synth
System
Syst
Technical, Techische
Tech
Technical High School/ Technische Hochschule
TH
Telephone
Tel
Temperature
Temp
Territory
Terr
Textile
Text
Transact(any ending, e.g. Transactions)
Transact
Tuberculosis
Tb
Tudomanyos
Tud
United States
US
University
Univ
Vascular
Vasc
Veterans Administration
Vet Adm
Veterinary
Vet
Weapons
Weap
Welfare
Welf
West
W
Wissenschaft
Wissensch
Zentral
Zent


Help Contents
State/Country Abbreviations

The following geographic address items are abbreviated:

  • U.S. states are abbreviated using the standard two-characters abbreviations
  • The names of foreign countries with more than 15 characters in their names are abbreivated. (Also listed here are country name changes made in the database).

You should use the abbreviations when entering search terms in the General Search or Place Search address fields. Other address elements such as corporate and institution names and street address and department/division names are also abbreviated.

To be sure that you enter the exact abbreviation, you can highlight the abbreviation and then use your browser's copy and paste functions to copy the abbreviation from this screen and paste it into the Address field on the General Search or Place Search screens.

Note that if the original publisher has abbreviated an address, it appears in the ISI database in this abbreviated form, which may not conform to ISI's standards for abbreviation.


U.S. State Abbreviations

Alaska-Kansas

Alaska
AK
Alabama
AL
Arkansas
AR
American Samoa
AS
Arizona
AZ
California
CA
Colorado
CO
Connecticut
CT
Canal Zone
CZ
District of Columbia
DC
Delaware
DE
Florida
FL
Georgia
GA
Guam
GU
Hawaii
HI
Iowa
IA
Idaho
ID
Illinois
IL
Indiana
IN
Kansas
KS
Kentucky-Ohio
Kentucky
KY
Louisiana
LA
Massachusetts
MA
Maryland
MD
Maine
ME
Michigan
MI
Minnesota
MN
Missouri
MO
Mississippi
MS
Montana
MT
Norch Carolina
NC
North Dakota
ND
Nebraska
NE
Nevada
NV
New Hampshire
NH
New Jersey
NJ
New Mexico
NM
New York
NY
Northern Mariana Islands
CM
Ohio
OH
Oklahoma-Wyoming
Oklahoma
OK
Oregon
OR
Pennsylvania
PA
Puerto Rico
PR
Rhode Island
RI
South Carolina
SC
South Dakota
SD
Tennessee
TN
Trust Territories
TT
Texas
TX
US Overseas Military
AA, AE, AP
Utah
UT
Virginia
VA
Virgin Islands
VI
Vermont
VT
Washington
WA
Wisconsin
WI
West Virginia
WV
Wyoming
WY


Country Name Abbreviations

Names of foreign countries are spelled out in the database as space permits (up to 15 characters). The abbreviations currently used for countries with names longer than 15 characters are listed in the left-hand column below. The right-hand column below lists the country name changes made to the database in the years listed.

Country Name Abbreviations

Antigua & Barbuda
Antigua & Barbu
Bosnia & Hercegovina
Bosnia & Herceg
Central African Republic
Cent Afr Republ
Dominican Republic
Dominican Rep
Equatorial Guinea
Equat Guinea
French Austral Lands
Fr Austr Lands
French Polynesia
Fr Polynesia
Malagasy Republic
Malagasy Republ
Mongolian People's Republic
Mongol Peo Rep
Netherlands Antilles
Neth Antilles
Northern Ireland
North Ireland
Papua New Guinea
Papua N Guinea
People's Republic of China
Peoples R China
Republic of Georgia
Rep of Georgia
Sao Tome E Principe
Sao Tome E Prin
Saint Kitts & Nevis
St Kitts & Nevi
Trinidad & Tobago
Trinid & Tobago
United Arab Emirates
U Arab Emirates
Additions/Deletions/Changes

1994
Deleted Czechoslovakia
Added Czech Republic
Added Slovakia
Changed Congo Peopl Rep to Congo
Changed Spanish Sahara to Western Sahara
Deleted Senegambia
Added Senegal
Added Gambia
Changed St Christ & Nev to St Kitts & Nevi
Added Eritrea
 
1993
Deleted USSR
Added:
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Byelarus
Estonia
Rep of Georgia
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Latvia
Lithuania
Moldova
Tajikstan
Turkmenistan
Russia
Ukraine
Uzbekistan
Added Bosnia & Herceg
Added Croatia
Added Macedonia
Added Slovenia
 
1991
Deleted Fed Rep Ger
Deleted Ger Dem Rep
Added Germany
 
1989
Changed Afars & Issas to Djibouti
Changed Belau to Palau
Changed Cent Afr Empire to Cent Afr Republ
Added Ciskei
Changed Portuguese Guin to Guinea Bissau
Changed Ivory Coast to Cote Ivoire
Changed Khmer Republic to Cambodia
Corrected Leichtenstein to Liechtenstein
Madagascar changed to Malagassy Republ
Added Namibia
Added Transkei
Added Venda


Help Contents
Cited Work Abbreviations

ISI abbreviates some words and phrases that appear in the titles of cited references. If a word or phrase appears on the list given below, it is abbreviated in the ISI Citation Database as indicated, and you should use the abbreviation when entering search terms in the Cited Reference Search Cited Work field.

To be sure that you enter the exact abbreviation, you can highlight the abbreviation and then use your browser's copy and paste functions to copy the abbreviation from this screen and paste it into the Cited Work field on the Cited Reference Search screen.

Academy
ACAD
Administration
ADM
Advance(d)
ADV
Agriculture
AGR
Akademy
AKAD
America(n)
AM
American Chemical Society
ACS
American Society for Testing and Materials
ASTM
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
ASME
Analysis
ANAL
Angewandte
ANGEW
Annals
ANN
Annual
ANN
Anthropology
ANTHR
Applied
APPL
Archives
ARCH
Arkiv
ARK
Association
ASS
Association for Computing Machinery
ACM
Australia
AUSTR
Behavior (al)
BEHAV
Bibliography
BIBLIO
Biochemistry
BIOCH
Biology
BIOL
Botany
BOT
British
BRIT
Bulletin
B
Cancer
CANC
Center
CTR
Centers for Disease Control
CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
CDCP
Chemical/Chemistry
CHEM
Chimie
CHIM
Chirurgie
CHIRURG
Clinic
CLIN
College
COLL
Company
CO
Comparative
COMP
Conference
C
Contemporary
CONT
Correspondence
CORRES
Dental
DENT
Department
DEP
Department of Health, Education & Welfare
DHEW
Deutsch
DTSCH
Development
DEV
Dictionary
DICT
Disease
DIS
East
E
Economy
EC
Education
ED
Electric/Electronic
ELECT
Elektrische/Elektronik
ELEKT
Encyclopedia
ENCY
Engineering
ENG
Environment
ENV
Environmental Protection Agency
EPA
Experiment(al)
EXPT
Faculty of Medicine
FM
Faculty of Science
FS
Federal
FED
Federal Register
FED REG
Food & Agricultural Organization
FAO
Foundation
FDN
General
GEN
Geschichte
GESCH
Government
GOVT
Handbook
HDB
Health
HLTH
History
HIST
Hopital
HOP
Hospital
HOSP
Industry
IND
Infectious
INFECT
Institute
I
Institute for Atomic Energy
IAE
Institute of Automobile Engineers
IAE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IEEE
Institute of Electronic Engineering
IEE
International
INT
Introduction
INTRO
Istituto
I
Jahrbuch
JB
Journal
J
Klinik
KLIN
Konference/Konferenz
K
Laboratories
LABS
Laboratory
LAB
Lawerence Berkeley Laboratory
LBL
Lecture
LECT
Letter
LETT
Library
LIB
Limited
LTD
Literature
LIT
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MIT
Material
MAT
Mathematics
MATH
Mechanical
MECH
Medecine
MED
Medicine
MED
Meditskkaya
MED
Medizin
MED
Meeting
M
Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company
3M CO
Molecular/Molecule/Molekular
MOL
Nacional
NACL
National
NATL
National Aeronautics & Space Administration
NASA
National Bureau of Standards (changed its name)
NBS
National Cancer Institute
NCI
National Institutes of Health
NIH
Nazionale
NAZL
North
N
Northeast
NE
Northern
NO
Northwest
NW
Nuclear
NUCL
Nuklear
NUKL
Nutrition
NUTR
Obstetrics
OBSTET
Organization
ORG
Paediatrics
PAEDIAT
Pediatrics
PEDIAT
Pharmaceutical
PHARM
Pharmacology
PHARM
Philosophy
PHILOS
Physiology
PHYSL
Polymer
POLYM
Proceedings
P
Progress
PROGR
Psychiatry
PSYCHIAT
Psychology
PSYCHOL
Public Health Service
PHS
Quarterly
Q
Radiation
RAD
Recherche
RECH
Religious
RELIG
Reproduction
REPROD
Research
RES
Respiratory
RESP
Review
REV
Rivista
RIV
School
SCH
Science
SCI
Society
SOC
Society of Automotive Engineers
SAE
Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
SPIE
South
S
Southeast
SE
Southern
SO
Southwest
SW
Statistics
STAT
Surgery
SURG
Technical High School/ Technische Hochschule
TH
Technical University
TU
Textbook
TXB
Transactions
T
United Kingdom
UK
United Nations
UN
United States
US
University
U
University of California Radiation Laboratory
UCRL
US Department of Agriculture
USDA
Veterinary
VET
West
W
World Health Organization
WHO
Yearbook
YB
Zeitschrift
Z
Zhurnal
ZH


Documentation version 4.0

Copyright ©1998 Institute for Scientific Information